Sharon Ann Lane
First Lieutenant
312TH EVAC HOSP, 67TH MED GROUP, 44TH MED BDE, USARV
Army of the United States
Canton, Ohio
July 07, 1943 to June 08, 1969
SHARON A LANE is on the Wall at Panel W23, Line 112

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Sharon A Lane
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In addition to the United States Military Medals received above, 1LT Sharon Ann Lane also received two medals from the South Vietnam Military. They were the Military Merit Medal and Vietnam Gallantry Cross.

The Military Merit Medal was the highest military decoration bestowed to enlisted personnel by the Republic of Vietnam during the years of the Vietnam War. The medal was established on August 15, 1950. The Military Merit Medal was modeled after the French Medaille Militaire and was awarded mostly to Enlisted for valor in combat.

The Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross also known as the Vietnamese Gallantry Cross or Vietnam Cross of Gallantry is a military decoration of the former Government of South Vietnam (Republic of Vietnam). The medal was created on August 15, 1950 and was awarded to military personnel, civilians, and Armed Forces units and organizations in recognition of deeds of valor or heroic conduct while in combat with the enemy. There were individual and unit level awards.

Military Merit and Gallantry Cross


- - The Virtual Wall, July 5, 2018

 

LaneSA01c.jpg Sharon Ann Lane was born in Zanesville, Ohio, but grew up in North Industry, Stark County, Ohio. She was graduated from Canton South High School in June 1961 and entered the Aultman Hospital School of Nursing the following September. After graduating from Aultman in 1965, she worked at the hospital until May, 1967, when she decided to try her hand in the business world. After three quarters at the Canton Business College she quit to join the U.S. Army Nurse Corps Reserve on April 18, 1968.

2LT Lane began training on May 5 at Fort Sam Houston in Texas. On 17 June she reported to Fitzsimons General Hospital in Denver, Colorado. While at Fitzsimons, she was promoted to First Lieutenant. On 24 April 1969 she reported to Travis Air Force Base in California with orders for Vietnam.

She arrived at the 312th Evac Hospital at Chu Lai on 29 April and was assigned to the Intensive Care ward for a few days before being assigned to the Vietnamese Ward. She worked 5 days a week (12 hours per day) in this ward and on the sixth day worked in Intensive Care.

At 0605, 8 June 1969, the 74th Medical Battalion reported a rocket hit between Wards 4a and 4b of the 312th Evacuation Hospital. The explosion killed two and wounded 27 US and Vietnamese personnel (see the 67th Medical Group log). 1LT Lane was killed by fragmentation wounds.

Although seven other American military nurses died while serving in Vietnam, 1LT Lane was the only American servicewoman killed as a direct result of enemy fire throughout the war.

A Memorial Service was held at Chu Lai on June 10, 1969, and a Catholic Mass was held June 11, 1969. Services in Canton were held June 14, 1969. 1LT Sharon Ann Lane was buried in Sunset Hills Burial Park, Canton, Ohio.



01 September 2001

Sharon Lane, the All-American Girl

She came to Vietnam not to fight or warrior to be
but to serve a higher purpose across the sea.

She knew the hurt, the pain, the dying
Sharon came to heal them and to stop the crying.

With purpose in her steps she made her rounds
To give hope to the soldier and to turn his frown upside down.

Whether it be the boy from back home or the Viet Cong
She did her job with care--she knew this is where she belonged.

She was cut down in the middle of the night
A piece of flying metal took her life.

She died alone
So far from home.

Her life was taken from us
Sharon's presence we still miss.

Let us never forget that freedom has a cost
Sharon became our hero-our hearts are empty by her loss.

Sharon was the All-American girl
She was perfection in an imperfect world.

Remembered by
"Doc" Kerry Pardue,
a field medic in Vietnam
3226 N Sycamore Place, Chandler, AZ 85224
kerrypardue@hotmail.com




 
A memorial from one who remembers,
07 Feb 1998

Updated 01 Sep 01 to include
"Doc" Kerry Pardue,
a field medic in Vietnam
3226 N Sycamore Place, Chandler, AZ 85224
kerrypardue@hotmail.com


 

LaneSA01d.jpg

Sharon Ann Lane was born in Zanesville, Ohio, but grew up in North Industry, Stark County, Ohio. She was graduated from Canton South High School in June 1961 and entered the Aultman Hospital School of Nursing the following September. After graduating from Aultman in 1965, she worked at the hospital until May, 1967, when she decided to try her hand in the business world. After three quarters at the Canton Business College she quit to join the U.S. Army Nurse Corps Reserve on April 18, 1968.

2LT Lane began training on May 5 at Fort Sam Houston in Texas. On 17 June she reported to Fitzsimons General Hospital in Denver, Colorado. While at Fitzsimons, she was promoted to First Lieutenant. On 24 April 1969 she reported to Travis Air Force Base in California with orders for Vietnam.

She arrived at the 312th Evac Hospital at Chu Lai on 29 April and was assigned to the Intensive Care ward for a few days before being assigned to the Vietnamese Ward. She worked 5 days a week (12 hours per day) in this ward and on the sixth day worked in Intensive Care.

Sharon A Lane
312th Evacuation Hospital (Sep 68-July 69)
Sharon A Lane
Previously 312th Evac R&E Triage

At 0605, 8 June 1969, the 74th Medical Battalion reported a rocket hit between Wards 4a and 4b of the 312th Evacuation Hospital. The explosion killed two and wounded 27 US and Vietnamese personnel. 1LT Lane was killed by fragmentation wounds.

Sharon A Lane

Sharon A Lane

Although seven other American military nurses died while serving in Vietnam, 1LT Lane was the only American servicewoman killed as a direct result of enemy fire throughout the war.

A Memorial Service was held at Chu Lai on June 10, 1969, and a Catholic Mass was held June 11, 1969. Services in Canton were held June 14, 1969. 1LT Sharon Ann Lane was buried next to her parents in Sunset Hills Burial Park, Canton, Ohio. She was survived by her mother Mary Kay Lane (1924-1976), father John E. Lane (1918-1979), brother Gary, and sister Judy.

Sharon A Lane
Mother in white & sister visit Grave.
     
Sharon A Lane
01 September 2001
Sharon Lane, the All-American Girl

She came to Vietnam not to fight or warrior to be
but to serve a higher purpose across the sea.

She knew the hurt, the pain, the dying
Sharon came to heal them and to stop the crying.

With purpose in her steps she made her rounds
To give hope to the soldier and to turn his frown upside down.

Whether it be the boy from back home or the Viet Cong
She did her job with care--she knew this is where she belonged.

She was cut down in the middle of the night
A piece of flying metal took her life.

She died alone
So far from home.

Her life was taken from us
Sharon's presence we still miss.

Let us never forget that freedom has a cost
Sharon became our hero-our hearts are empty by her loss.

Sharon was the All-American girl
She was perfection in an imperfect world.

Remembered by
"Doc" Kerry Pardue,
a field medic in Vietnam
3226 N Sycamore Place, Chandler, AZ 85224
kerrypardue@hotmail.com

 
A memorial from one who remembers,
07 Feb 1998

Updated 01 Sep 01 to include
"Doc" Kerry Pardue,
a field medic in Vietnam
3226 N Sycamore Place, Chandler, AZ 85224
kerrypardue@hotmail.com


 

Following her death in 1969, many individuals and organizations honored Lane in a variety of ways. On June 10, 1969 Chu Lai, RVN Memorial Service Held and on June 11, 1969 Chu Lai, RVN Catholic Mass held in her honor. Her funeral services in Canton were held June 14, 1969.

On July 4, 1969, 1LT Sharon Ann Lane was posthumously award the Bronze Star Medal with "V" device for her efforts as noted below.

Sharon A Lane

On 11 November 1969, the Fitzsimons Hospital named its recovery room the Lane Recovery Suite and put a plaque and a picture on display. In that same year, the Daughters of the American Revolution named her Outstanding Nurse of the Year, and posthumously awarded her the Anita Newcomb McGee medal in 1970.

In 1970, the 1965 Graduating Class from Aultman's School of Nursing put a plaque, picture, and poem written by a classmate, in Morrow House (the nursing school residence hall) in her honor. In that same year, The 1970 Class at Aultman School of Nursing dedicated their yearbook to her.

On October 18, 1970, Faircrest Memorial Junior High School was dedicated to Sharon Lane and four other servicemen from Canton South High School who lost their lives in Vietnam; a plaque for each one was placed at the entrance to the school.

On May 29, 1973, Memorial Day, a statue of Lane was dedicated in front of Aultman Hospital in Canton Ohio where she attended nursing school. It was dedicated by the William F. Cody Garrison #50 of the Army/Navy Union. This statue was built with funds raised in the community, and is one of the first Vietnam memorials constructed in the United States. Names of 110 local servicemen killed in Vietnam are listed on the base of the statue. The Aultman Health Foundation holds an annual ceremony honoring Lane at the statue.

Sharon A Lane

In 1986, the Aultman Hospital opened the Sharon Lane Woman's Center in its front lobby. The Sharon Lane Health Center, in conjunction with the Stark County District Library and the North Canton Public Library to offer comprehensive health information for our community. Located off the Aultman Hospital main lobby, the center is staffed by health education specialists. Patients, their families, students and community members are invited to use free educational resources.

On May 26 1986, The Canton Chapter of the Vietnam Veterans of America officially changed its name to the Sharon Lane Chapter #199,

Sharon A Lane

Roads and streets in Denver, Colorado, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and Fitzsimons Army Medical Center (Aurora, CO) have been named in her honor.

Sharon A Lane

On September 12, 1995, Fort Hood, Texas dedicated the Sharon Lane Volunteer Center.

In 2001, Fort Carson, Colorado, Evans U.S. Army Hospital dedicated the Sharon A. Lane Medical Library. A permanent display in her honor can be seen at the Ohio Society of Military History in Massillon, Ohio.

Also on & July 2001, Jay Maloney, a friend, on another site, recollected: "I was stationed at the 312th Evacuation Hospital when Sharon was killed. The damage to Ward 4 was quite severe that day. The round was a 122 mm rocket. I've read that she died of a single frag wound to her throat, but I recall seeing a single wound just below her clavicle. Memory does odd, unimportant things. It doesn't matter, does it? I recently returned to Vietnam (March 2001) and visited a new clinic built in the little Village of Tan Hiep, [Tan Hiep Commune-Chu Lai, Vietnam] 3 or 4 miles from the site of the old 312th, right on Highway 1. The clinic was paid for by Vietnam Veteran nurses in Sharon's memory. My wife and daughter were with me on that trip. My daughter's birthday is the same as Sharon's - 40 years to the day; '43 to '83. Interesting how time freezes for the dead. Sharon was a pretty 26 year-old. Now she'd be nearly 60."

Sharon A Lane
Sharon Ann Lane Clinic

Unknown location for "In Memory Of" Bench, but it has the Department of The Army Symbol so may be near an Army facility in the United States.

Sharon A Lane


- - The Virtual Wall, July 5, 2018

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