James Richard Loy
Hospitalman
H&S CO, 2ND BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF
United States Navy
Green Bay, Wisconsin
May 20, 1947 to January 11, 1968
JAMES R LOY is on the Wall at Panel 34E, Line 30

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James R Loy
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21 Dec 1998

James R. Loy
James R. Loy (far right) and the Marines he served.

Although I never knew my father, he died six months before I was born, I am proud of his duty to our Country.

I have a photo of him and four other men 11 days before he died saving another. The photo has always raised questions of what it was like, what he was like, and what the future would have been.

I am happy with my life the way it has turned out. I have no regrets, but there is still a small void that only a father could fill.

From his son,
Rob Loy
rob.loy@cox.net




CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the SILVER STAR MEDAL posthumously to

JAMES R. LOY
HOSPITALMAN
UNITED STATES NAVY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 10 January 1968 while serving as a corpman with the Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. As a squad-sized patrol from Company "F" proceeded in total darkness along the safety lane within a minefield while on an ambush mission near Con Thien, the point man inadvertantly led the squad into the mined area. Within minutes, two mines were detonated simultaneously, wounding three Marines. Upon hearing the explosions, Hospitalman Loy unhesitatingly moved from the rear of the squad, entered the minefield, and manuevered to the side of the wounded men to administer first-aid treatment. Realizing that the life of one seriously injured Marine depended on his immediate evacuation to a medical facilty, and aware that it would take considerable time to clear a path through the minefield, Hospitalman Loy carefully prepared the injured man for movement and unaided, proceeded to carry his comrade from the hazardous area. Slowly moving across the minefield, Hospitalman Loy had advanced approxiamately thirty meters when he was mortally wounded by an exploding mine. By his bold iniative, extraordinary courage, and selfless devotion to duty, Hospitalman Loy inspired all who observed him. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

For the President,

T. H. Moorer
Admiral, United States Navy
Chief of Naval Operations


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