Ronald Coleman Toth
Lance Corporal
M CO, 3RD BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Westminster, Colorado
June 02, 1947 to September 07, 1967
RONALD C TOTH is on the Wall at Panel 26E, Line 32

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Combat Action Ribbon
 
Ronald C Toth
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6 Jul 2004

Ron, you, Tiggy, and I were tight during boot camp and ITR. We spoke of going to Vietnam as grunts once we had our orders and went through staging battalion and left about the same time for Nam. Tiggy and me ended up in the same battalion 3/1, he with India and me with Mike. When he found out about your death, I think from your family somehow, he made sure I knew as soon as I got back in from the bush. I had a note pinned to my cot from him as he was out when I came in. I was shocked to read the words he had written:

"Ron has been killed somewhere in the Northern part of Vietnam not far from the DMZ - a rifle shot."

That is all the details that were provided. I prayed you went quick and I remember your words just before we left:

"I know I will not make it back and I'm okay with it just as long as I do not die in a lot of pain and by myself.

I have since spoken with one of your Corpsmen and he described your death as painless and quick and you were among many Marines when it happened. Your premonition was correct and your wish was granted. That is some comfort to us and your family but we still to this day miss you. I have that picture of you and me that we took on base at Pendleton in one of those instant pix machine that we spent a buck on. I look at that photo often and dream what might have been?

Good friends that spent time together sharing our families and our hopes and dreams and frustrations as well. Tiggy has moved from Chicago and is semi-retired in Arizona. I am still living in Cincinnati. I married my girlfriend - the one I shared pixs of with you and Tiggy. We have been married 36 years with two daughters and 5 grandkids. I am so very blessed to have known you and very blessed to be able to return and live my life. I will always remember you and the others that died that did not return. God bless you and your family, Ron. We will all be together agin someday.

"A MAN IS NEVER DEAD UNTIL HE IS FORGOTTEN"
You will live in my heart and the hearts of many forever.

Semper Fi Ron..

Brian
Cincinnati, Ohio
bbs@kemba.com

 
A Note from The Virtual Wall

On 27, 28, and 29 August, a complete 360 degree sweep on Con Thien was completed with minimal contact. From that day forward, during the week leading up to the elections and beyond, there was increasing evedence of NVA moving in close to Con Thien on the north, west, and southwest.

On 1 September, two companies returning from patrols received incoming artillery fire while on the move west of Con Thien. The incoming artillery also increased on Con Thien exceeding 200 rounds on some days. Patrols to the direct south of the position on 2 and 3 September encountered a recently dug in enemy position. Air strikes and coordinated company sweeps displaced the NVA from a positon that appeared to be planned as an ambush for a Main Supply Route convoy.

On 4 September, after making a solid contact to the southwest of Con Thien, a dug in NVA positon was outflanked by a maneuvering company with 37 NVA confirmed KIA and 10 probables. During the contact, enemy artillery fire was received, indicating an apparent NVA Forward Observer (FO) capability with the NVA ground troops not previously encountered in this area.

On 7 September, two companies again took incoming in the same area to the southwest after making contact while on patrol. At 1102 hours, Con Thien received three rounds of 152mm artillery from the area at YD111779. One bunker took a direct hit. Three Marines were killed and one seriously wounded. Artillery fire was returned. At 1215 hours, Con Thien received 14 rounds of 82mm mortar fire from unknown enemy position.

At 1305 hours, Company M made enemy contact with an estimated enemy squad and two heavy machine guns at YD106688. By 1325 hours, Company M reported enemy forces had increased and they were receiving enemy artillery fire. Company K, at YD108682 was also receiving incoming artillery. At the same time, Con Thien was receiving fire. 81mm mortars were fired in support of Company M contact and Company I was committed to support Company M.

By 1800 hours, contact was broken and Companies M and I moved into defensive night time positions. As a result of the day's contacts, Companies I, K, and M reported 12 friendly KIAs and 35 WIA with 11 evacuated for medical treatment. Seven confirmed enemy deaths confirmed, 12 probables were reported. The 3/4 Marines at Con Thien lost the following 16 men. The first 3 men were killed on Con Thien from the bunker hit:

During afternoon contact, the Mike 3/4 patrol had contact with an NVA unit about a kilometer south of Con Thien, losing 13 more Marines in that engagement. Official reports from the field showed 12 KIA.

Today's Army records show 13. The Virtual Wall is unable to determine which of the 11 men medevaced passed away enroute to the medical facility as none of the men's records show admission to a medical treatment facility. The 13 men lost were:


Son of Jane Ortez Toth and Coleman Toth, Ronald was born in Denver area and the city directory for Denver shows them in Denver in 1951. He attended Westminster High School before he entered the service in August 1966.

It is unknown when he arrived in Vietnam to start his tour but he had less than 2 years of service when he was killed in action. Accounting for training assignments after September 1966, he may have been in country no more than 8 months. It is unknown when below photo taken.

Ronald C Toth

LCpl Toth was survived by his parents, living in Westminster Colorado. He is buried in Fort Logan National Cemetery, Denver Colorado.

Ronald C Toth


- - The Virtual Wall, October 9, 2014

 
6 Jul 2004

Ron, you, Tiggy, and I were tight during boot camp and ITR.We spoke of going to Vietnam as grunts once we had our orders and went through staging battalion and left about the same time for Nam. Tiggy and me ended up in the same battalion 3/1, he with India and me with Mike. When he found out about your death, I think from your family somehow, he made sure I knew as soon as I got back in from the bush. I had a note pinned to my cot from him as he was out when I came in. I was shocked to read the words he had written

"Ron has been killed somewhere in the Northern part of Vietnam not far from the DMZ a rifle shot."

That is all the details that were provided. I prayed you went quick and I remember your words just before we left:

"I know I will not make it back and I'm okay with it just as long as I do not die in a lot of pain and by myself.

I have since spoken with one of your Corpsmen and he described your death as painless and quick and you were among many Marines when it happened. Your premonition was correct and your wish was granted. That is some comfort to us and your family but we still to this day miss you. I have that picture of you and me that we took on base at Pendleton in one of those instant pix machine that we spent a buck on. I look at that photo often and dream what might have been?

Good friends that spent time together sharing our families and our hopes and dreams and frustrations as well. Tiggy has moved from Chicago and is semi-retired in Arizona. I am still living in Cincinnati. I married my girlfriend - the one I shared pixs of with you and Tiggy. We have been married 36 years with two daughters and 5 grandkids. I am so very blessed to have known you and very blessed to be able to return and live my life. I will always remember you and the others that died that did not return. God bless you and your family, Ron. We will all be together agin someday.

"A MAN IS NEVER DEAD UNTIL HE IS FORGOTTEN"
You will live in my heart and the hearts of many forever.

Semper Fi Ron..

Brian
Cincinnati, Ohio
bbs@kemba.com


 

A Note from The Virtual Wall

Early on 07 Sep 1967 the 3/4 Marines at Con Thien lost four men to 152mm artillery fire Later in the day a Mike 3/4 patrol had contact with an NVA unit about a kilometer south of Con Thien, losing 12 more Marines in that engagement:
  • Sgt David A. Bradshaw, Manistee, MI
  • Cpl Hugh C. Goins, Columbus, OH
  • Cpl Thomas J. Pesek, Jourdanton, TX
  • LCpl Alvin Cullins, Jacksonville, FL
  • LCpl Jeffery P. Myers, Mattapan, MA
  • LCpl Leroy J. Phillips, Luray, VA
  • LCpl Terry L. Sumerlin, Bandon, OR
  • LCpl Ronald C. Toth, Westminster, CO
  • LCpl John H. Walker, Chattanooga, TN
  • Pfc Michael B. Himes, Birmingham, AL
  • Pfc Duane L. Morningstar, Maple Lake, MN
  • Pfc Lyndol E. Tolleson, Houston, TX

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